ECE 329: FIELDS AND WAVES I

2019 Spring; 2019 Fall

Course Descriptions:
Electromagnetic fields and waves fundamentals and their engineering applications: static electric and magnetic fields; energy storage;
Maxwell's equations for time-varying fields; wave solutions in free space, dielectrics and conducting media, transmission line systems; time- and frequency-domain analysis of transmission line circuits and Smith chart applications.

Course Web Page
http://courses.engr.illinois.edu/ece329/

 

 

ECE 110: INTRODUCTION TO ELECTRONICS

2020 Spring

Course Descriptions:
Introduction to selected fundamental concepts and principles in electrical engineering. Emphasis on measurement, modeling, and analysis of circuits and electronics while introducing numerous applications. Includes sub-discipline topics of electrical and computer engineering, for example, electromagnetics, control, signal processing, microelectronics, communications, and scientific computing basics. Lab work incorporates sensors and motors into an autonomous moving vehicle, designed and constructed to perform tasks jointly determined by the instructors and students. Class Schedule Information: Students must register for one lab and one lecture section. 1 hour of credit may be given for the lab taken alone with the approval of the department.

Course Web Page
http://courses.engr.illinois.edu/ece110

 

 

ECE 598: FUNDAMENTALS OF LIGHT-MATTER INTERACTIONS

2020 Fall

Course Descriptions:
This course will provide an overview of how light interacts with materials. Although such interaction is most rigorously described using quantum mechanics, the approach used here is mainly classical. We will first introduce classical dipole oscillators coupled with Maxwell’s equations. We will study the linear optical properties (dielectric function, susceptibility, refraction, dispersion, and absorption) of gases, liquids, and solids, including metals, semiconductors, and dielectrics. We will also study dispersion relations, which allow us to completely describe the dielectric function of materials by only measuring the full spectrum of a single property. We will consider how quantum mechanics modify our picture of the optical properties of materials. The effect of magnetic polarization will be considered, as we look at the optical activity and Faraday rotation. In addition, we will study nonlinear contributions to the polarization, and understands how this leads to the generation of new frequencies and to irradiance-dependent refractive index and absorption. Finally, we will introduce the unique interactions of light with nanoparticles, photonic bandgap materials, and artificial materials such as metamaterials.

      Course Web Page
      http://bionanophotonics.ece.illinois.edu/ece-598yz